Devenez Naturopathe Certifié 
Notre formation s'adresse tant à ceux qui souhaitent apprendre à se soigner naturellement, qu'à ceux qui souhaitent accompagner proches ou patients vers un art de vivre plus sain.

10 Tips for Using a Bullet Journal to Boost Creativity

, by Carrie Cousins

You’ve seen some of the beautiful bullet journals on Pinterest, and there’s more to this trend than an exercise in creativity. Using a bullet journal can make you a master of the website universe. And it all starts with a pen and paper.

For those who aren’t familiar, a bullet journal is a notebook (of any kind) that you use to create lists, calendars and brainstorming notes all in one place. Essentially a bullet journal is a customized planner/sketchbook to help you capture notes, thoughts and inspiration. Cool bullet journals are one of the hottest elements on social media; but this analog tool is more than a ploy, it really can help you boost creativity and plan website design projects.

1. Keep Track of To-Do Items

The most common use of a bullet journal is as a to-do list. Use the journal to track progress of work or project tasks and even life tasks.

Every person organizes their journal differently, but many bullet journalers include a “key” to note progress of to-dos. It’s a little more fun and wacky than just putting a strike through a line item.

2. Create a Project Timeline

A project timeline is really just a giant to-do list. Use a bullet journal to develop milestones and create a task manager that you want to engage with.

The year in pixels example below is striking because it starts with an almost blank canvas and rewards the user as they fill in elements. The bullet journal is useful in this way because it encourages you to get moving.

3. Capture Notes from Meetings

A bullet journal can actually help you save time—even if it looks like a labor of love. Carry a single notebook for everything. Pages can be mixed and match with different elements, such as lists, ideas and notes.

By having everything in one place, in an almost chronological format, it will be easy to find and go back to ideas and notes in a pinch.

4. Daily Sketch/Doodle Reminder

There’s nothing like putting pen to paper to help create a little inspiration for almost any type of project. Taking a few minutes each day to sketch or doodle can help keep you feeling creative, even when burnout is creeping up on you.

Make it part of your daily work schedule so that you’ll stay fresher in a design sense and feel refreshed when it comes to projects. (And as an added bonus, you never know when some of those mindless sketches or doodles might turn into something usable.)

5. Build a Mood Board

Just because it is called a “journal” doesn’t mean you have to write everything.

Use a bullet journal to collect design elements and even create a mood board for projects. Add divots from other places; it’s totally OK to add sticky notes or paste in photos for inspiration.

6. Save Ideas for Later

The best thing about a bullet journal is that all of your ideas are in one place. You can start down one creative path and keep expanding on an idea day after day. You can see how a creative thought has evolved and shaped over time.

And you have the original ideas to go back to at any time. This is a great change from drawing something in illustrator, making changes and saving without keeping older iterations of the concept.

The journal concept helps you see a design process and evolution over time. (You might go back and love where you started, or wonder what in the world you were thinking.)

7. Experiment with Lettering

For a lot of designers, hand letting and typography is something we only look at from afar. Stretch your muscles by drawing letters—that is what writing is all about—in different styles.

You don’t have to be a calligrapher, but there’s something special about the feel of drawing letters that’s hard to explain unless you try it. You may never show these lettering styles to anyone else, but it can help you think about lines and curves and how words come together from a visual standpoint.

8. Create Goals

One of the most common—and pinned—bullet journal page-inspiration concepts is for setting and keeping track of goals.

Whether personal or professional (or a mix of both), a bullet journal can help you outline what you want to do today, this month, this year or even long term. Create a visual map that shows what your goals are and how you can work toward them.

There are two benefits to setting goals in a bullet journal:
You have actually written down what you want to do. This can make a goal seem more real.
By putting the goal in a journal that you are interacting with regularly, you’ll see the goal and a reminder of what you are working toward. (That makes this a great option for big goals that inspire you.)

9. Practice Organization

Use a bullet journal to get organized. Try using a notebook with grid lines to practice using a grid and creating doodles within a set of constraints.

Designing anything within a set on constraints is a valuable practice. It can help make you a better designer because you are practicing creativity within a set of boundaries. This is something that will apply to most projects, from creating a logo in a certain shape or planning for a visual treatment that must fit above the scroll of a web page.

10. Use for Fluid Scheduling

While you can use a more traditional format for a bullet journal, most people pick a notebook with blank pages (rather than planner styles with dates). This allows you to create project lists that are more fluid.

To-dos don’t have specific deadlines with this format. You can build a list of things to do and only add deadlines for necessary items. This allows for more fluidity, which often facilities creativity, because tasks can be done when the inspiration strikes.

So that your journal stays organized in usable manner, it is recommended to add dates to pages to track some progress. (I note the date that a new journal page is started in the top corner as a reference point.)

Conclusion

Here’s the thing that happens as the pages of your bullet journal start to fill up: You can see progress from project and you also have a tiny little book of art. The sketches, doodles and ideas are a source of collective inspiration as you flip back through the pages.

So the bullet journal provides an immediate creative outlet and helps spur long-term creative thought. So find a notebook and some colored pens or pencils and start journaling!

LAST DAY: BUNDLE of 500+ Retro/Vintage Design Elements – only $27!

Source

View online : https://www.webdesignerdepot.com/20...

Articles in this section

  • What’s New for Designers, May 2018

    21 May, by Carrie Cousins

    Do you ever get bogged down with some of your tools? They work, but you know there’s got to be a better way to do something. Hopefully, this month’s collection has the solution. It’s packed with design tools that are lightweight and functional.
    If we’ve missed something that you think should have been on the list, let us know in the comments. And if you know of a new app or resource that should be featured next month, tweet it to @carriecousins to be considered! Duotone Effect Generator
    Create a quick, and trendy, duotone effect with the Duotone Effect Generator. Upload a photo and pick a (...)

  • Popular Design News of the Week: May 14, 2018 – May 20, 2018

    20 May, by Cameron Chapman

    Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 
    The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.
    Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily (...)

  • 6 Pointless Design Achievements You Should Totally Go For

    18 May, by Ezequiel Bruni

    Web design is a process of carefully planned and researched steps. You have a job to do, and users to satisfy. Ideally, everything you do has a purpose. There is a point to it all.
    But life is weird, complex, and even fun sometimes. Sometimes, you end up doing something that might seem a bit excessive, a bit “out there”, or even downright silly. But you do it just because it makes you feel good to have accomplished it, or because it looked fun. In gaming parlance, we call these things “achievements”.
    Achievements in gaming often don’t give you anything but a sense of pride and (...)

  • 9 A11y Tips for Global Accessibility Awareness Day

    17 May, by Suzanne Scacca

    The 17th May 2018 is Global Accessibility Awareness day, which makes today the ideal time to consider how inclusive our experiences are for those users who may be disabled, differently-abled, or temporarily inconvenienced.
    2017 was a big year for website accessibility lawsuits. Seyfarth and Shaw reported that, by year’s end, there were 814 ADA Title III federal lawsuits filed against websites in the United States alone. Perhaps the most well-known of these cases was Juan Carlos Gil v. Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc.
    The blind plaintiff, Mr Gil, alleged that certain parts of the website essential (...)

  • Take Control of WordPress with New Elementor Pro 2.0

    Elementor 2.0 is an innovative approach to site building in WordPress that lets you customize any part of your site, with absolutely zero coding knowledge.
    A plugin rather than a theme, this flexible approach means that you can use Elementor 2.0 to manage your site design, and unlike some WordPress site builders, you won’t be tied to a particular theme; Elementor 2.0 works with almost any WordPress theme from any vendor, as well as custom themes.
    Build everything on your WordPress site exactly as you want it, without having to switch themes to find the right functionality, or pay a (...)

  • Adobe XD CC is Now Available for Free

    15 May, by Ben Moss

    In a step clearly intended to maintain dominance in an increasingly competitive market, Adobe have announced that XD CC (eXperience Design) is being released to the community as a free application.
    XD is amongst the most well-rounded, reliable, and innovative UX design applications available; by making it free of charge to both Mac and Windows users, Adobe are hoping to make it the de facto choice globally.
    Intriguingly Adobe executives are now openly referring to XD as Adobe’s flagship product—a moniker previously reserved for its 25 year-old, raster-editing, behemoth Photoshop.
    We (...)

  • 20 Best New Portfolios, May 2018

    14 May, by Ezequiel Bruni

    Welcome back, readers. It’s May, and that means the weather’s getting hotter. Stay inside, away from the evil, evil sunshine. Relax, grab a lemonade, and browse through this month’s collection of portfolios. This time around, we have a whole lot of grid-based minimalism with black borders, and some other stuff, too.
    Note: I’m judging these sites by how good they look to me. If they’re creative and original, or classic but really well-done, it’s all good to me. Sometimes, UX and accessibility suffer. For example, many of these sites depend on JavaScript to display their content at all; this is (...)

  • Popular Design News of the Week: May 7, 2018 – May 13, 2018

    13 May, by Cameron Chapman

    Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 
    The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.
    Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily (...)

  • Comics of the Week #434

    12 May, by Walter

    Every week we feature a set of comics created exclusively for WDD.
    The content revolves around web design, blogging and funny situations that we encounter in our daily lives as designers.
    These great cartoons are created by Jerry King, an award-winning cartoonist who’s one of the most published, prolific and versatile cartoonists in the world today.
    So for a few moments, take a break from your daily routine, have a laugh and enjoy these funny cartoons.
    Feel free to leave your comments and suggestions below as well as any related stories of your own… Left brain search
    Ironic poster (...)

  • Google Finally Makes .App Available

    11 May, by Andrei Tiburca

    It’s been three years since Google spent $25 million on the rights to the .app domain. Finally, the company is making this top-level domain available for purchase. Early access ended May 8th. And the domain is now up for public purchase.
    Why is this so important? For obvious reasons, .app will be ideal for all app developers. The .app domain allows for new domain names that might have previously been taken, as well as makes it easier to remember. 300-500 websites are created each minute, so this opens a lot of new doors for app developers.
    Google came out and said that they are not (...)

page suivante